March 20th

Same day events that happened in boxing history
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straycat
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March 20th

Post by straycat » Sat Mar 20, 2010 11:00 am

1925- Charley Phil Rosenberg W 15 Cannonball Martin, NYC. Wins World Bantamweight Title.

1942- Sugar Ray Robinson TKO 7 Norman Rubio at the Madison Square Garden
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1965- Nicolino Locche Pts 10 Hector Hugo Rambaldi in Estadio Luna Park, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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1967- Luis Rodriguez W 10 Bennie Briscoe, Philadelphia, PA. Rodriguez weighed in at 152; Briscoe at 155. Referee: Zach Clayton 47-45 | Judge: Dave Beloff 48-42 | Judge: Earl Vann 47-43.

1970- Freddie Little W 15 Gerhard Piaskowy, Berlin. Retains lineal, WBA, and WBC World Junior Middleweight Titles.

1970- Chartchai Chionoi W 15 Efren "Alacran" Torres, Bangkok. Regains lineal, WBC, and Ring Magazine World Flyweight Titles.

1976- John H. Stracey KO 10 Hedgemon Lewis, Wembley. Retains lineal, WBC, and Ring Magazine World Welterweight Titles.
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1977- Leon Spinks KO 1 Jerry McIntyre in Louisville, Kentucky, USA https://uploadir.com/u/nm2yv79j

1977- Ron Lyle SD 12 Joe Bugner in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
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https://twitter.com/BoxingHls/status/12 ... 9625482241

1982- Prudencio Cardona KO 1 Antonio Avelar, Tampico, Mexico. Wins lineal, WBC, and Ring Magazine World Flyweight Titles.
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1982- Michael Dokes KO 5 Tommy Franco Thomas for the NABF Title in Atlantic City https://uploadir.com/u/12c3cb0g

1982- Teddy Mann UD 10 Robbie Epps in Atlantic City

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1982- Tim Witherspoon KO 2 Luis Acosta in Atlantic City
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1983- Seung Hoon Lee KO 6 Ricardo Cardona in Masan, South Korea https://uploadir.com/u/4sq5ie0n

1983- John Verderosa TKO 4 Sean O'Grady in Chicago, Illinois, USA https://uploadir.com/u/8c50jxuj

1983- John Collins UD 10 Lenny LaPaglia for the vacant USA Illinois State Middle Title

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1983- David Sears TKO 1 Clarence Osby in Chicago
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1985- Darryl Fuller TKO 11 Kel Robin in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
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1987- Gilberto Roman W 12 Frank Cedeno, Calexico, Mexico. Retains lineal World Junior Bantamweight and WBC World Super Flyweight Titles.




1992- Iran Barkley W 12 Thomas Hearns, Las Vegas. Wins WBA World Light Heavyweight Title. By the final round Hearns’ head swells to “elephant man” like proportions.

1992- Thierry Jacob W 12 Daniel Zaragoza, Calais, France. Wins WBC World Super Bantamweight Title.

1993- Henry Maske W 12 Prince Charles Williams, Dusseldorf, Germany. Wins IBF World Light Heavyweight Title.

1993- Yuri Arbachokov KO 9 Muangchai Kittikasem, Lop Buri, Thailand. Retains lineal and WBC World Flyweight Titles.

1999- Ike Ibeabuchi KO 5 Chris Byrd, Tacoma, Washington. Heavyweight Bout. The maniacal Ibeabuchi’s last fight.

2010- Wladimir Klitschko KO 12 Eddie Chambers, Düsseldorf, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany. Retains lineal, IBF, IBO, WBO, and Ring Magazine World Heavyweight Titles.



1997- Tony Zale Dies at age 83.
Anthony Florian Zaleski (May 29, 1913 – March 20, 1997) an American boxer. Zale was born and raised in Gary, Indiana, a steel town, which gave him his nickname, "Man of Steel." In addition, he had the reputation of being able to take fearsome punishment and still rally to win, reinforcing that nickname. Zale was known as a strong body puncher, who punished his opponents and steadily wore them down before knocking them out.
Zale was a 2-time world middleweight champion and made the Ring Magazine's list of 100 greatest punchers of all time. Zale is best remembered for his three bouts over a 21-month period with Rocky Graziano for the middleweight crown. These three bouts were among the most brutal and exciting middleweight championship matches of all time. The first match took place in Yankee Stadium, New York. Zale had served in World War II, was thirty-three years old, and had been inactive for about four years. Graziano was on a winning knockout streak and seemed to be in his prime. In their first match (September 27, 1946), after flooring Graziano in the first round, Zale took a savage beating from Graziano, and was on the verge of losing the fight by TKO. However, he rallied and knocked out Graziano in the sixth round to retain his title. The rematch, a year later in Chicago (July] 16, 1947), was a mirror image of their first fight. Graziano was battered around the ring, suffered a closed eye and appeared ready to lose by a knockout, then rallied and knocked Zale out in the sixth round, becoming middleweight champion of the world.
Their last fight was held in New Jersey the following year (June 10, 1948). Zale regained his crown, winning the match by a knockout in the third round. The knockout blows consisted of a perfect combination of a right to Graziano's body, then a left hook to Graziano's jaw. Graziano was knocked unconscious. This fight was Zale's last hurrah. His age and the many ring wars he fought seemed to catch up with him in his next fight against European Champion Marcel Cerdan later that year, who stopped him in the eleventh round to win the middleweight championship of the world (September 21, 1948). Graziano commented that years later he would wake up in a cold sweat having had the recurring nightmare of being back in the ring with Zale, who he said really was a man of steel.
Edith Piaf, who at the time was having an affair with Cerdan, was in the audience, praying to Saint Therese for his victory. Two of the three Graziano fights and the Cerdan fight were named Ring Magazine fights of the year.
Zale was originally cast to play himself in the movie Somebody Up There Likes Me. When Paul Newman (playing Graziano) and he were sparring prior to filming, Newman got rough and Zale knocked him out. Zale was replaced by Courtland Shepard for the final fight scene

1992- Iran Barkley W 12 Thomas Hearns, Las Vegas. Wins WBA World Light Heavyweight Title. By the final round Hearns’ head swells to “elephant man” like proportions. Voted Upset of the Year by Ring magazine

1999- Ike Ibeabuchi KO 5 Chris Byrd, Tacoma, Washington. Heavyweight Bout. Ike's fight with Byrd was his last fight as a professional.
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ScapposeJohn commenting on Shane Mosely possibly being unaware he was taking PED's wrote: Likewise. It reminds me of President Clinton saying that he smoked weed in college but never inhaled. Yeah..........right.
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Post by straycat » Sun Mar 20, 2011 3:49 pm

Passed Away On This Day

1997- Tony Zale
(born Anthony Florian Zaleski in Gary, Indiana May 29, 1913 – March 20, 1997)
American boxer born and raised in Gary, Indiana, a steel town, which gave him his nickname, "Man of Steel." In addition, he had the reputation of being able to take fearsome punishment and still rally to win, reinforcing that nickname. Zale was known as a strong body puncher, who punished his opponents and steadily wore them down before knocking them out.
Zale was a 2-time world middleweight champion and made the Ring Magazine's list of 100 greatest punchers of all time. Zale is best remembered for his three bouts over a 21-month period with Rocky Graziano for the middleweight crown. These three bouts were among the most brutal and exciting middleweight championship matches of all time. The first match took place in Yankee Stadium, New York. Zale had served in World War II, was thirty-three years old, and had been inactive for about four years. Graziano was on a winning knockout streak and seemed to be in his prime. In their first match (September 27, 1946), after flooring Graziano in the first round, Zale took a savage beating from Graziano, and was on the verge of losing the fight by TKO. However, he rallied and knocked out Graziano in the sixth round to retain his title. The rematch, a year later in Chicago (July] 16, 1947), was a mirror image of their first fight. Graziano was battered around the ring, suffered a closed eye and appeared ready to lose by a knockout, then rallied and knocked Zale out in the sixth round, becoming middleweight champion of the world.
Their last fight was held in New Jersey the following year (June 10, 1948). Zale regained his crown, winning the match by a knockout in the third round. The knockout blows consisted of a perfect combination of a right to Graziano's body, then a left hook to Graziano's jaw. Graziano was knocked unconscious. This fight was Zale's last hurrah. His age and the many ring wars he fought seemed to catch up with him in his next fight against European Champion Marcel Cerdan later that year, who stopped him in the eleventh round to win the middleweight championship of the world (September 21, 1948). Graziano commented that years later he would wake up in a cold sweat having had the recurring nightmare of being back in the ring with Zale, who he said really was a man of steel.
Edith Piaf, who at the time was having an affair with Cerdan, was in the audience, praying to Saint Therese for his victory. Two of the three Graziano fights and the Cerdan fight were named Ring Magazine fights of the year.
Zale was originally cast to play himself in the movie Somebody Up There Likes Me. When Paul Newman (playing Graziano) and he were sparring prior to filming, Newman got rough and Zale knocked him out. Zale was replaced by Courtland Shepard for the final fight scene.



Born On This Day

1957- Jesse Ferguson (born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
Retired American boxer who fought in several noteworthy boxing matches in the 1980s and 1990s. His professional career is filled with matches with Champions and contenders and his name is linked with most of the boxing stars of the '80s and '90s.
After an amateur career in the early 80s, Ferguson turned pro in 1983 at the 'late' age of 25. He had 10 straight wins (all by knockout), the most notable being a 4-round knockout of Reggie Gross.
This earned him a place in ESPNs 1985 Young Heavyweight tournament. He made a debut with a 4-round knockout of Richard Scott, and followed it up in the semi-finals with a 10-round points win where he outpunched James "Buster" Douglas, a fight that would become more significant over the years, as Douglas went on to upset Mike Tyson in 1990 and win the undisputed heavyweight championship of the world. In the final he took on Tony Anthony and knocked him out in the 10th round, earning himself a world ranking.
His success was short lived however. He was matched up with Carl "The Truth" Williams, who was himself coming off a disputed 15-round points loss to Larry Holmes. Williams' experience won out, as he climbed off the floor twice to knock out Ferguson in 10 rounds.
In a theme that would continue throughout his long career, Ferguson was matched tough in his next fight. In 1986 he took on prospect Mike Tyson who was 17-0, and making his national television debut. After an even fight Tyson broke Ferguson's nose in the fifth round with an uppercut, sending him to the canvas. Referee Louise Rivera disqualified Ferguson in the next round, for what he deemed "excessive holding." The local commission later changed the result to a "TKO" for Tyson.
From this point on Ferguson became a part-time boxer, finding it difficult to find meaningful fights but used regularly by all the top contenders as a sparring partner, who preferred training with him than risking fighting him. In 1987 he fought only once, on the undercard of the Tyson/Tucker fight, knocking out ex-contender George Chaplin, sending him into retirement. In 1988 he fought 22-0 Orlin Norris for his NABF belt. Norris was a fast rising prospect with slick skills and some big wins under his belt already. Ferguson's ring rust showed as he was outpointed over 12 dull rounds.
It may be said that by this point Ferguson's heart was no longer fully in the game. By the time he fought Oliver McCall in 1991, he had only had one fight in three years, a 6-round kayo of Terry Armstrong in 1990. Although rusty and overweight, Ferguson appeared to get the better of McCall. However Ferguson had been relegated to 'trial horse' status and McCall was given the decision. Three years later in 1994, McCall would knockout Lennox Lewis in two rounds to become heavyweight champion of the world. In 1992 he took on Bruce Seldon where an indifferent Ferguson retired after five rounds with an eye injury. Three years later, Seldon would win the vacant WBA heavyweight title.
Ferguson dropped decisions to two ex-world champions, Michael "Dynamite" Dokes and Tony "TNT" Tubbs but in 1993 would see a turnaround of his fortunes.
Ferguson was brought in as an opponent for Ray Mercer on the undercard of a Riddick Bowe title defense against Michael Dokes. Mercer was expected to knock Ferguson out and fight Bowe for the title. Instead Mercer showed up ill prepared and Ferguson, perhaps motivated by the big stage, dominated him. At one point Mercer allegedly offered Ferguson a bribe to "lay down," realising his big shot at Bowe was slipping away from him. Ferguson refused the money and won a unanimous decision.
For the first time in years Ferguson came in under 230 lbs to fight Riddick Bowe for the title. At 224 Ferguson was as cut as he'd been since the mid-80s, but although he came to fight, Bowe was in impressive form yet again and dispatched Ferguson in two rounds.
Despite the crushing defeat, Ferguson was back in the ring shortly afterwards. He was matched against Mercer yet again, who this time came in shape at 223. Although the fight was closer, Ferguson still appeared to outpunch Mercer and get the better of him. Once again Ferguson was on the wrong end of a close decision as Mercer was awarded a split decision that was even jeered by his hometown crowd at Atlantic City. In 1994 Ferguson travelled to the U.K. to fight Frank Bruno, who was returning after his loss to Lennox Lewis. The overweight Ferguson collapsed in one round in a passionless performance. A year later Bruno would outpoint Oliver McCall and win the WBC heavyweight title.
In his only other fight in 1994 Ferguson was matched with Larry Holmes, the 44-year-old former great who was on another comeback trail. Ferguson despite being out of shape had Holmes reeling in the second, and appeared to get the best of the ex-champ. Yet again Ferguson was on the wrong side of the points decision, and even the New York Times reported it as: "A robbery. Larry Holmes came off second-best against Jesse Ferguson." By 1995 Ferguson was frequently out of shape and made little effort in his fights. He had Jeremy Williams out on his feet but quit in the 7th with a swollen eye. He dropped Alex Stewart twice but was denied the decision. He did nothing against Danell Nicholson and pulled out after 8 rounds. In all three fights he looked distinctly uninterested.
In 1996 he was hired as chief sparring partner for champion Mike Tyson in the lead-up to his fight with Bruce Seldon. It was during this time, with a little encouragement from Team Tyson, Ferguson began to realise he was better than he gave himself credit for.
He returned late in 1996, now aged 39, and with his new positive attitude destroyed undefeated Bobby Harris. He followed this up with two more wins before a high profile fight on HBO with hard hitting Tongan Samson Po'uha, in 1997. He decked Po'uha several times before knocking him out in the 8th round.
This led to another big fight on HBO in 1998, where a now 40-year-old Ferguson took on young and undefeated powerful punching contender Hasim Rahman for the USBA belt. Rahman's best right hands failed to budge the grizzled veteran, however his youth rather than skill got him by and he won a wide decision that didn't do justice to the struggle Ferguson gave him. Rahman would go on to defeat Lennox Lewis and thus become the Undisputed Heavyweight Champion of the World.
The revitalised Ferguson was still on a roll. He followed up the Rahman fight with an easy 10-round decision over ex-cruiserweight champ Tyrone Booze, and then took on Obed Sullivan, ranked No. 4 in the world, and used his experience and skills to completely befuddle and outpunch Sullivan, breezing a perfect win.
In 1999 Jimmy Thunder, citing an injury, dropped out of a fight with the gargantuan and ferocious Polish contender Andrew Golota. True to form, Ferguson was tapped as Thunder's replacement and instantly accepted the bout on short notice. Upon learning that Fergsuon would now be his opponent, the enigmatic and bizarre Golota reportedly locked himself in a room and wept profusely for several hours before his wife was finally able, after an exhaustive effort, to extricate him and consequently agree to the fight. Despite Golota's pre-fight trepidation, he completely shut out the crafty Ferguson, rocking him a couple of times and winning a lopsided decision.
After this loss Ferguson's manager handed him back his contract and stopped answering his calls. Ferguson could no longer find fights. His career ended in 1999 with a record of 26-18-0 with 16 knockouts.
Ferguson spoke of comebacks in 2000 and 2002 but each time nothing came of them. He complained of being "blackballed" by the boxing establishment.
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ScapposeJohn commenting on Shane Mosely possibly being unaware he was taking PED's wrote: Likewise. It reminds me of President Clinton saying that he smoked weed in college but never inhaled. Yeah..........right.
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Re: March 20th

Post by straycat » Thu Mar 20, 2014 8:06 am

[youtubefullurl]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WO4_hXRsqc8[/youtubefullurl]
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ScapposeJohn commenting on Shane Mosely possibly being unaware he was taking PED's wrote: Likewise. It reminds me of President Clinton saying that he smoked weed in college but never inhaled. Yeah..........right.
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Re: March 20th

Post by KSTAT124 » Thu Mar 20, 2014 7:09 pm

From TTR's archives:

2010-

3/20- Dusseldorf, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany- TTR #1 ranked heavyweight Wladimir Klitschko retained the Ring Magazine, IBF, WBO, and IBO titles by knocking out TTR #4 ranked heavyweight Eddie Chambers at 2:55 of the 12th round. Klitschko dominated the bout, especially from the sixth round on. The champion, #15 in TTR's Pound-for-Pound rankings, improved to 54-3 with 48 KOs. Chambers, ranked #1 by the WBO and #3 by The Ring, the IBF, and the IBO, suffered only his 2nd defeat. He has 35 wins including 18 by knockout.

3/20- Key West, Florida, USA- WBC International heavyweight titlist Odlanier Solis successfully defended his belt for the third time. Ranked #2 by the WBC, #8 by the WBA, #13 by TTR, and #15 by the WBO, Solis was in control throughout the disappointingly short bout with Costa Rican Carl Davis Drumod. The 2004 Olympic heavyweight gold medalist picked up the pace in the latter part of third round, hurting Drumond with a series of hard shots to the face and chin. After the round ended, the now 26-3 (20 KOs) Drumond abruptly decided that he had had enough. The victory ups the unbeaten Solis' record to 16-0 with 12 KOs. He is seeking a final eliminator against WBC #1 ranked Ray Austin (28-4-4, 18 KOs).

3/20- Cancun, Quintana Roo, Mexico- TTR #17 ranked middleweight Marco Antonio Rubio, the WBC's #4 contender and reigning Latino champion, won a non-title bout against TTR unranked Jaison Palomeque, demolishing the overmatched Colombian in the 2nd round. Rubio improved to 46-5-1 with 40 KOs while Palomeque fell to 12-4-1 with 7 KOs or 13-4 with 7 KOs depending on the source.

3/20- Le Cannet, Alpes-Maritime, France- TTR #12 ranked middleweight Hassan N'Dam N'Jikam was scheduled to face former IBF middleweight title challenger Elvin Ayala (20-4-1, 9 KOs) for the vacant WBA International middleweight title but ended up fighting late substitute Mike Ermis in a non-title bout instead. The WBA #3, WBO #3, and WBC #24 ranked N'Jikam stopped the German journeyman, who had won 5 of his last 6 bouts, in the 10th and final round. N'Jikam is now 23-0 with 16 KOs while Ermis dropped to 8-9-2 with 4 KOs.

3/20- Strzelce Opolskie, Poland- TTR #11 ranked welterweight Rafal Jackiewicz, staying active while he waits for his mandatory shot at the IBF title, scored an 8-round, unanimous decision over TTR unranked super welterweight Turgay Uzun. Jackiewicz, the IBF's #1 contender who is also ranked #6 by the WBO, raised his record to 36-8-1 with 18 KOs. He's won 21 in a row with the previous four coming over Jackson Osei Bonsu, now IBF champion Jan Zaveck, Luciano Abis, and Delvin Rodriguez (in an IBF eliminator). Uzun, a Turkish veteran based in Germany, slipped to 31-13-2 with 19 KOs.

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Re: March 20th

Post by KSTAT124 » Tue Mar 22, 2016 7:56 pm

SIXTY YEARS AGO:

March 20, 1956-

Phoenix, Arizona, USA-

Middleweights Jimmy Martinez (63-22-7) and Dick Goldstein (29-11-4) battled to a 10-round draw.

Oakland, California, USA-

Heavyweight contender Young Jack Johnson (12-7-1) suffered an upset TKO-4 loss to Ben Wise (5-5-1).

Miami Beach, Florida, USA-

In a battle between heavyweight contenders, Harold Carter (18-1-2) unanimously outpointed Bob Satterfield (40-21-4) over 10 rounds.

Carter and the hard-punching veteran Satterfield had fought to a draw three weeks earlier.

The pair would fight again on August 1, 1956 with Carter stopping Satterfield in the 5th round.

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